Archive

Monthly Archives: January 2013

I actually really enjoy a good fashion sketch, but when it’s taken to the next level it can be so very satisfying to the eye.  Browsing some of my fav art and fashion outlets, I recently found a few illustrators who’s work I instantly fell in love with.  So fun and creative…  Makes me want to break out my watercolors and markers.

Kevin Wadaa

kevin-wadaa-fashion-illustration-13

kevin-wadaa-fashion-illustration-1-600x400Sophie Griotto

sophie-griotto-fashion-illustrations-2

sophie-griotto-fashion-illustrations-1

sophie-griotto-fashion-illustrations-5 Amy Martino

yellow-bird-machine-600x574Nicolas Tavitian

nicolas-tavitian-fashion-illustration-1

11-11_11

W2P

Advertisements

jim-naughten-namibia-book

These gorgeous images, taken by fashion photographer Jim Naughten, left me in awe at the beauty of this tribe and their countryside.  The portraits exude strength and regality which is only intensified by their unique costume and stark background.  They look surreal, almost like paintings instead of photographs.  These marvelous characters can be found in the book entitled Conflict and Costume: The Herero Tribe of Namibia.

jim-naughten-namibia-book-6

jim-naughten-namibia-book-5

Here is the description:

“The magnificent traditional costume of the Herero of Namibia, southern Africa, is a stark reminder of the country’s tumultuous past. In the late 19th century, the influence of missionaries and traders in German Southwest Africa led to the adoption by the Herero of the European dress of the day. Over time, the voluminous gowns, completed by a cattle-horn-shaped headdress, came to represent the cultural identity of the Herero women. The men’s ceremonial dress also harks back to colonial times: following the brutal war of 1904, the Herero adapted the uniforms of German soldiers for their own Otruppe (‘troops’) movement. In Conflict and Costume, acclaimed photographer Jim Naughten captures the colorful Herero attire in a series of spectacular portraits. Set against the Namibian landscape, these dramatic images show the striking costumes and their proud owners to full effect: men in elaborate, home-made paramilitary uniforms, and women in spectacular floor-length frocks with matching horns. Dr Lutz Marten contributes an insightful text that places the dress in its historical context.”

jim-naughten-namibia-book-14

jim-naughten-namibia-book-15

jim-naughten-namibia-book-16

jim-naughten-namibia-book-22

jim-naughten-namibia-book-20

jim-naughten-namibia-book-17

Takes me back to my undergrad Art in Africa course.  I especially love the womens’ costumes.  The colonial influence is clear, but the use of African textiles and headdress makes the style their own.

More info here http://www.jimnaughten.com/project/hereros_intro/

%d bloggers like this: